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mercedes benz lives by to this day. the best, or nothing. that is what drives us. >> additional funding provided by these funders. >> and by bloomberg. a provider of multimedia news and information services worldwide. ♪ >> from our studios in new york city, this is "charlie rose." ♪ >> charlie: sebastian pinera was elected president of chile in january with a mandate to create jobs and bolster the economy. he is chile's third richest citizen. 13 days before he took office, his country suffered one of the most devastating earthquakes in recorded history. he dubbed himself the reconstruction president and made earthquake recovery his top priority. he is here in new york for the united nations general assembly. i am very pleased to have him here at this table for the first time. first of all, welcome. >> thank you, charlie. >> charlie: tell me about the earthquake and how you approached that. >> it was the fifth worst earthquake in the known history of mankind, and it s devastating. it was 10 days before we took office, and it really cost us first of all more than 500 lives. there are
're already important for us. because many conflicts are around us. so therefore our attempt, our word and our insistence to contribute to the solution of the problems is appreciated. >> couric: and the prime minister of the palestinian authority, salam fayyad. >> it's one that's based definitely on dealing violence out of the equation for sure. that's our interest. that's how we defined it. from our point of view. it happens to be consistent with obligations that we took on the road map and going back to 1993. it's in our best interest, we're not doing no one else a favor but ourselves when we subscribe to nonviolence. as a really key component to what we have to do to get to freedom. >> couric: a program note: our interview with the c.e.o. of google, eric schmidt, will be seen at a later date. tonight, the president of turkey and the prime minister of the palestinian authority when we continue. captioning sponsored by rose communications from our studios in new york city, this is charlie rose. >> rose: abdullah gul is here, he's the president of turkey, a key u.s. ally and nato member, turke
is not very solid. it's about $30 sml a years which which is peanuts compared to what the u.s. has with china, with the european union. but the potential is huge. >> rose: and we conclude with one of the most interesting entrepreneurs in all of china, he is jack ma. his company is alled alibaba. >> core competence of our companies, we have 20,000, grow from 18 people, now 20,000 people. and we focus a lot on the making sure the culture, everybody works for helping others instead of just making money. and we believe different from wall street, we believe customer number one, employee two, shareholder three. >> rose: customer one, employee, two, shareholder three? >> yes, again, this is my religion. >> rose: russia and the world, china and technology when we continue. captioning sponsored by rose communications from our studios in new york city, this is charlie rose. >> rose: president obama came to office promising to reset relations with russia. he and russian president dmitry medvedev appeared to form a personal bond. they have since signed a nuclear arms reduction treaty-- now waiting to be
in france is being watched closely, because europe faces us see us strikes as governments bareback cherished benefits. bbc news, paris. >> the spanish prime minister and has called on a basket separatist movement to lay down its arms forever. -- of basque separatist movement to lay down its arms forever. mozambique has reversed its decision to raise bread prices by 30%. food riots last week left 13 dead. bread will now be sold at its previous price of 14 cents. every year since 1998, more than 30,000 japanese people have killed themselves. japan's health ministry estimates cases of suicide and depression caused the economy $32 billion last year. the government has launched a task force to address the problem. more than two weeks of political deadlock have ended in australia with confirmation that labor's julia gillard will continue as prime minister, would be backing, at last, of to independenct mp's. she has been near west possible majority. nick bryant has this. >> it is like the finale of a tv reality show, with the winner kept a closely-guarded secret until announced live on television.
. and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. >> lehrer: the u.s. moved into what is planned as its final military phase in iraq today after ending its combat role. newshour correspondent kwame holman begins our coverage. >> reporter: cleaning up and packing-- that's what u.s. soldiers were doing on bases across iraq today. humvees rolled on to flatbed trucks and rows of equipment awaited transport home. last night, president obama marked the formal end of combat operations in iraq with a speech from the oval office. >> our combat mission is ending, but our commitment to iraq's future is not. this new approach reflects our long-term partnership with iraq , one based upon mutual interest and mutual respect. >> reporter: today, american military leaders marked the occasion with a change in command of the remaining 50,000 troops in iraq. vice president biden and defense secretary gates were among those presiding at the main u.s. military headquarters on the outskirts of baghdad. >> i pray that all those scarred by this war in iraq come to know the bond of lasting peac
of the atmosphere every year. bnsf, theen engine that connects us. >> chevron. this is the power of human energy. >> intel. sponsors of tomorrow. >> and by the alfred p. sloan foundation, supporting science, technology and improved economic performance and financial literacy in the 21st century. and with the ongoing support of these institutions and foundations. and this program was made possible by the corporation for public broadcasting. and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. >> brown: president obama spent this labor day in the midwest to rally with union members and unveil a new plan to promote job growth. but even as he sharpend his focus on the economy, his political opponents sharpened their responses. >> around the nation this holiday, parades, barbecues and a continuing unease over the dismal jobs market. coming just after friday's report showing unemployment had edgeded up again to 9.6%, this was a labor day in which the state of the american work force was very much front and center. with that in mind and with a mid-term election just two months off
in disguise because it has forced us to double of rate of our productivity and have no doubt that inherent in our spirit the more enemies we have, the more united and hard we work. >> rose: mahmoud ahmadinejad for the hour. next. >> rose: mahmoud ahmadinejad, the president of iran, is back in new york city. the rituals of his yearly visit are now familiar. he speaks to members of the press, he holds breakfast meetings and a lot of other meetings at the united nations. he address it is u.n. general assembly. his strip often accompanied by developing events. this year was the release of american hiker sarah shourd while two other hikers-- shane bauer and joshua fatale-- remain in an iranian jail accused of espionage. iran has been sanctioned four times by the security council for its failure to comply with the u.n. nuclear investigative agency the i.a.e.a. the obama administration, europe japan and even some arab nations have followed with some additional sanctions. some are very clear that a military strike should remain on the table if the sanctions does not work. one of those is former pr
in europe and the possible threat in the u.s. >> brown: margaret warner examines china's growing economic and military assertiveness in asia and globally. >> they're breaking diplomatic egg which is three or four years ago they would not have broken. so i think the change is palpable. >> woodruff: we talk to former clinton administration secretary of labor robert reich-- the last in our series of conversations on extending the bush-era tax breaks. >> brown: and jonathan miller of "independent television news" reports from northwest pakistan, where relief-aid is still slow in coming two months after the floods began. >> this is one of the worst affected areas in pakistan, but these people industrial no safe water, no food, no shelter, no medicine. something has gone very wrong. >> woodruff: that's all ahead on tonight's "newshour." major funding for the pbs newshour has been provided by: >> i want to know what the universe... >> looks like. >> feels like. >> from deep space. >> to a microbe. >> i can contribute to the world by pursuing my passion for science. >> it really is the key to the
parliamentary elections. some of the political players may decide to use violence themselves as a pressure point. >> lehrer: newshour correspondent spencer michels examines the impact of u.s. supreme court rulings on local gun regulations in california. >> among the first results of the supreme court decisions on guns: gun shows like this may become more common in california. >> woodruff: plus an encore look at jeffrey brown's profile of tap dance great maurice hines passing the torch and tradition to a new generation. >> lehrer: that's all ahead on tonight's newshour. major funding for the pbs newshour has been provided by: and with the ongoing support of these institutions and foundations. and... this program was made possible by the corporation for public broadcasting. and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. >> lehrer: the east coast kept a weather eye on the sea today, waiting for the arrival of hurricane earl. the storm weakened some during the day, but still had winds of 115 miles an hour. in kill devil hills, north carolina, the day dawned on a relativel
to the president with a record low approval rating. >> the government is forcing us into a showdown. the only thing that can make as budget is a showdown. >> that showdown may force the government into further concessions, perhaps of face saver for the unions. two-thirds of the country are for reforms already approved by the house. it is president sarkozy who has the open hand. -- the upper hand. startednd's economy has to shrink again, despite coming out of recession earlier this year. gdp was down by 1.2% on the first quarter of the year. that contrasts with predictions it would have a small increase. the controversial diabetes drug avandia has been suspended. it has been linked to increased risk of heart failure. youtube and its owners have won a landmark piracy case brought by a spanish tv channel. each channel said its rights and violated when its videos were broadcast on youtube. the court found it was the copyright holder's responsibility to report the contents to youtube. the chairman for the international palate -- panel on climate change. it was reported that the panel contained an errone
be a sign that god would want us to do it, that the american people do not want the mosque there and, of course, muslims do not want us to burn the koran . the imam has agreed to move the mosque. we have agreed to cancel our event on saturday. >> suarez: the pressure on pastor jones from around the world had been increasing on him throughout the day. just this morning, president obama added his voice to those of international leaders asking jones to call it off saying it would be a "recruitment bonanza for al qaeda." >> as commander-in-chief of the armed forces of the united states, i just want him to understand that this stunt that he is talking about pulling could greatly endanger our young men and women in uniform who are in iraq, who are in afghanistan. >> reporter: in response to fears of retaliation, the state department issued a travel warning today for citizens abroad. it also ordered u.s. embassies around the world to ramp up their security in preparation. in pakistan and afghanistan today protestors burned u.s. flags and shouted anti-american slogans in anticipation of the
, it's going to make us stronger, as if he operates in a parallel universe that bears no relation to reality. >> charlie: as you suggested to me earlier, you have never seen a head of state that you think is prepared to say more untruths? >> i have never in my life seen a head of state look an interviewer in the eye -- look the camera straightforward and lie about something he knows the international community has been filled about the stories -- the story of the stoning. he said, "no one has been accused -- condemned to stoning in iran." for three weeks, that was the top of the news inside and iran and outside iran. he looked into the camera and he said, "i am the head of state, i say no one was stoned, end of story." >> charlie, whenever i watch ahmadinejad doing interviews, i am reminded of a famous "seinfeld" episode where george costanza asked the secret of lying and george said to jerry "it's not a lie if you believe it" and sometimes i think ahmadinejad is delusional, he believes that iran is the freest country in the world, he believes it has an incredibly prosperous econo
cry from 1994's "contract with america," and the grand signing ceremony on the steps of the u.s. capitol. today, house republican leaders appeared in shirt sleeves at a hardware and lumber store in suburban virginia 30 miles from capitol hill with this year's policy prescriptions. minority leader john boehner and his top lieutenants spelled out their central point. >> government is out of control in washington, and we need to rein it in, and begin a new drive for a smaller, less costly and more accountable government in our nation's capital. these are the things that the american people are demanding, >> reporter: while the backdrop has changed, republicans hope their document, called "a pledge to america," will produce similar results to 1994. that year's plan helped the party gain 54 seats and take the house majority for the first time in 40 years. one of the main architects of the 2010 version is california's kevin mccarthy. he accused democrats of ignoring the country's wishes. >> from the billion dollar bailouts to the stimulus package that failed to stimulate, to the gover
through literature and you can find out by talking. and you can find out by using your imagination. and for an appelate judge that's important. because when you're in that room, as you are, and writing and reading, what you are goinging to write is going to affect other people. so it's very important to have the imagination to try to understand how your opinions and your decisions will affect the lives of others. >> rose: why are things that you read like literature important to a judge? >> i told a group of undergraduates here in new york a few weeks ago when i was asked that question. and i said it's like knowing a foreign language or reading a novel. we only have one life. and we only really know our own. but by reading novels and by reading what other people have written about life, and about different ways of living, you can lead more lives than your own. and you can understand how people could have lived a quite different life. and that's a wonderful privilege to be able to do that as well as i think a necessity for someone whose's goinging to affect the lives of other people
this chance for peace. as the u.s. combat mission in iraq comes to an end, the american vice-president says baghdad is close to a new government. no regrets from tony blair about his decision to send british troops to invade iraq. very warm welcome to "bbc world news," broadcast to our viewers in the states on pbs and also around the globe, with me, peter dobbie. coming up later for you -- how your name and postcode can affect your chances of getting a job in france. and new pictures of the world's most famous ship wreck -- the titanic in 3-d. the u.s. president barack obama has urged israelis and palestinians not to let slip an opportunity for peace that he says may not soon return. he made the remark as he opened a landmark peace talks. our middle east editor jeremy bowen reports from washington. >> if it feels as though they have all been this way before. an american president, and israeli prime minister, launching a new attempt at middle east peace in fact -- -- these at the white house and condemning bloodshed. >> there are going to be those who do everything they can to undermine the
. but the australian people told us in no uncertain terms on that day and the days that followed is this -- that we will be held more accountable than ever before. >> the election august 21 ended in deadlock. neither julia gillard nor tony abbott's liberal coalition succeeded in forming a government. the arithmetic was not balanced. yesterday, it was neck and neck. do you get right -- julia gillard had 74 seats. tony abbott had 73. first, a vote for tony abbott, giving both sides 74 seats. but then the but -- two for julia gillard. last week, the opposition leader tony abbott described himself as the head of the government in waiting. today, he was forced to concede. >> the coalition won more seats than our opponents, but sadly, we did not get the opportunity to form a government. >> there has not been a hung parliament here since the second world war. australians are used to strong and decisive government. this one looks altogether more for agile and raises the question -- how long will it last? nick bryant, bbc news, sydney. >> and six months after their election in iraq, still no government. gab
commonwealth games but the bbc for minister tells us that his country will be ready. >> conducted according to international standards. >> deeply divided over afghanistan, the new book that is embarrassing president obama. welcome to bbc world news. coming up later for you, 30 years from the start of the iran of rock war, we look back at the -- iran -- iran and iraq war, we look back at the bloody generation. are the issues that you wear footing you in danger on the open road -- are the issues -- are the shoes that you wear putting you in danger on the open road? negotiators from six countries are arguing with each other at a major conference in moscow. the scramble has come center stage. the arctic holds vast untapped fields of oil and gas, becoming more accessible as global warming melts more and more arctic ice. russia is claiming almost half of a million square miles of extra territory. several others have staked a claim. the moscow conference is intended to build cooperation but the competition is so fierce, some people fear another cold war. >> a record breaking voyage through the shr
-tongued rhetoric which dragged us into it. a lot of people thought it was a good idea and yet now conveniently within britain and many other countries it's blamed on this george bush and his cleverred-tonged mood until tony blair. think think he wants to say, no i was a bigger figure than that. >> rose: also from london, an old friend of this program, john burns now the london bureau chief of the "new york times". >> we were perhaps transfixed by the relief would come to iraq with the overthrowing of saddam and yes maybe we should have spent more time difficult as it would have been under saddam to look at the trauma, the psychological trauma inflicted on iraq by the ba'ath party and saddam over a period of 30 years. all of that it can accept. if i had to do it over again i would have looked at that because it was the fractured pitch thatter that society in part along with saddam terror overground as government going underground as an insurgency that made the american venture in iraq next to impossible to achieve. >> couric: from london john and john when we come back. captioning sponsored by
jailed in teheran, about today's release and what it tells us about the regime. >> brown: then margaret warner interviews former british prime minister and united nations envoy tony blair about the newest round of middle east peace talks. >> i find it hard to see if these two political leader s in this context with an american administration pushing for a deal, if we can't get one, i don't know where we go from there. >> ifill: fred de sam lazaro has the story of a jewish entrepreneur working with palestinians and israelis for both peace and profit. >> brown: susan dentzer of "health affairs" and karen tumulty of the "washington post" sort through the latest give- and-take on health care politics. >> ifill: and we sit down with writer and cartoonist austin kleon for a dose of poetry inspired by newspaper prose. >> what i found out is that i need to treat the newspaper as a blank canvas in order to really come up with a good poem. >> brown: that's all ahead on tonight's newshour. major funding for the pbs newshour has been provided by: and with the ongoing support of these institutions a
the country would say, "we're not there yet." if the election is about the policies that are going to move us forward versus the policies that will get us back into a mess, then i think the democrats will do very well. >> holman: one such policy is mr. obama's push to extend middle-class tax cuts, something he argued should garner bipartisan support. >> 97% of americans make less than $250,000 a year... $250,000 a year or less. and i'm saying we can give those families-- 97%-- permanent tax relief. now, that seems like a common- sense thing to do. and what i've got is the republicans holding middle-class tax relief hostage because they're insisting we've got to give tax relief to millionaires and billionaires to the tune of about $100,000 per millionaire, >> holman: on health care, the president was pressed about a government report showing health care costs on the rise. that, despite the passage of legislation aimed at bending down the cost curve. >> we didn't think that we were going to cover 30 million people for free, but that the long-term trend, in terms of how much the average family i
reporter in washington for as -- bob woodward is still making waves. >> our reporter in washington for us. let's go to new york with our correspondent. barbara, even in a time of austerity, the u.s. has to live up to its aid and given the responsibilities, but he seems to want nothing less than an entirely new responsibilities -- has to live up to its aid and other responsibilities, but he seems to want nothing less than new responsibilities. >> this is a much broader theme that it involves, trade policy and investment policy and things like that. instead of food aid, for instance, he might invest in the agricultural sector, and some have welcomed this more structural approach to trying to stop poverty, but it is said that president obama did not commit any new money to the millennium development goals, even though america is very bar behind -- far behind the goals it set tenures ago. >> barbara, -- the goals it set 10 years ago. >> barbara, what about this new role? >> i think what he is going to be tried to do is have a result -- he is going to be trying to have a new result. rather tha
the economy, but the president with a record low approval rating. >> the government is forcing us to a showdown. the only thing that can make them budget is a showdown. >> that may force the government to make further concessions, but two-thirds of the country are resigned to reforms already approved by the lower house. with the senate vote looking to be a formality, president sarkozy has the upper hand. christian fraser, bbc news, paris. >> our economy has started to shrink again. it came out of recession earlier this year. dee dee was down by 1.2% on the first quarter of the year -- gdp was down by 1.2%. youtube and its owner, googles, have one of landmark piracy case brought by a spanish tv channel. the court ruled it was the responsibility of the copyright owner to tell googol -- google that their property appeared on the youtube. the suspension of of controversial diabetes drugcontroversialavandia. -- controversial diabetes drug, avandia. it is linked to an increased risk of heart failure. it was supposed to be a showcase moment for india, showing itself to be a global power.
. and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. >> lehrer: today's vote in the u.s. senate means the ban on gays in the military will stand, at least for now. opponents of the ban fell four votes short today in their bid to break a filibuster. >> the vote was about whether to begin debating a military budget bill. it includeded language calling for repeal of don't ask don't tell. but the republican filibuster held and the measure stayed stalled at a vote of 56-43. >> the motion is not agreed to. >> lehrer: 60 votes were needed. it came down to a handful of senators including maine republican susan collins. she backs repeal of the 17-year-old ban on gays and lesbians serving openly in the military, but she opposed a limit on amendments. >> i think we should welcome the service of these individuals who are willing and capable of serving their country. but i cannot vote to proceed to this bill under a situation that is going to shut down the debate and preclude republican amendments. that too is not fair. >> lehrer: it was clear that most republicans opposed repeal of don't as
out to sell books because of protests for one reason or the other. they use all of the sense of animus, it seems. what is it about? >> it's difficult to say, really. i mean, first of all, you know, as i always point out to people, i did win three elections rather than lose them. >> rose: (laughs) yes, you did. yes, and some say you should have quit then. >> some say i should never have started. but you can't listen to all those voices. and also, frankly, there's a huge difference between the people who will come and protest, the people no who throw things at you are not, in my book, normal people. most normal people, even though they disagree with you, have a disagreement with you, they don't feel the need to either shout at you or throw something at you, they just say "well, i disagree." there was a poll just a few days ago that showed on balance a positive appreciation of my time as prime minister. is so i think this thing is... parts of, frankly, you live as a progress progressive politician as well with parts of the right of the media can be pretty aggressive when taking you on. wh
and the doubters. it george mitchell gave a good assessment after the first session of talks. >> all of us reaffirm our commitment to reaching a shared goal for the just, lasting, and lasting peace. >> -- proper peace. >> the issue that is sticking is the settlements. the palestinians are threatening to walk away unless there is no more settlements. the israelis say this is not possible. the prime minister is pinned in by a coalition pressing him not to give ground. how much progress is made on the issue has not emerged. the parties have sat together for two long sessions and will return to jerusalem for more talks tomorrow. so, no big announcements and the best anyone can hope for is that they are continuing. there will be many long hard days of communications and negotiation if this is to bear fruit. >> she has been held in solitary confinement for more than a year but today the u.s. female hiker was reported -- was released from iran. she and her companions were accused of spying. they insist that they got lost in iraq. according to her mother, she has been denied treatment for serious health pr
, who covers capitol hill for "the new york times." thanks for being back with us. so what's this delay all about? >> well, the senate clearly doesn't want to get embroiled in this issue before the election. it's just too unpredictable and the story line for democrats is clean, as things stand now. they're making the case that republicans would block tax relief for the middle class to hold out for tax break force the wealthy. republicans, of course shall want to extend those tax cuts for everyone. and so it's easier in the view of democrats to push this until a lame duck session. the political situation will obviously be less intense then. but as you said, the house speaker today left open the possibility of forcing a vote. and that could get really interesting next week. >> woodruff: now why the different calculus in the senate and in the house. >> the calculus probably isn't different. the conventional wisdom still is that in the end the house will decide to go home and campaign without taking this vote. but there's no reason for speaker pelosi to relent right now when she thinks she'
to go nuclear or not, i think the thing that would make them go nuclear is for us to continue to threaten to attack them even with nuclear weapons, either us or the israelis and not communicate with them. so i would communicate with them and stop threatening them. jup we conclude with the new movie about facebook. it's called "president social network, we have the director david fincher and the screen writer aaron sorkin. >> you never want to present a carkner a movie that you don't empathize with. it was not a character assassination. we were... we had a guy who from certain perspectives he was a judas and he had betrayed his friend. obviously that's a specific point of view. >> at the sender is a very modern invention but the story is as old as story telling itself, of friendship and loyalty and betrayal and power and class and things that shakespeare would have written about and it's lucky for me that none of these guys were available so i got to write about it. >> rose: jimmy carter, aaron sorkin and david fincher when we continue. words alone aren't enough. workers who lo
's oval office address provided a useful prame this week that was supposed to be about iraq but it was about so much else, including the economy, uncertain foreign policy and politics. why is august never a good month for barack obama? now we are safely in september, the question must be asked. >> you detected the pattern haven't you. he has had difficulties in augusts and ended this one in a very busy week. when he gave that speech in the oval office, he talked about turning the page. what he meant to convey is, it's time now to focus on the economy. but as that speech showed, the tension in that speech as he was trying to deal with a lot of issues at once underscored the political problems that he and the democrats and the administration have. i mean, he said the economy is my principal responsibility as president. that's why we want to turn the page. but turning the page, let's just start with iraq. yes, the combat mission is over. we still have 50,000 troops in iraq. we will have a troop presence there until the end of next year. violence has not gone. it has been down,
the european union used enprecedented language to rebuke one of its most powerful states >> this is a digrace. >> the commissioner said there was paralleling with world war ii >> this is a situation i would thought europe would not have to witness again after the second world war. >> enough is enough. >> the french government says the roma are actually given 300 euros each when they leave the county >> france is a proud founding member and rarely received such a dressing down and deliberately mislead the eu. part of the union's anger relates to an internal french memo when mentions dimantels roma camps a priority. some see it as targeting ethnic group. >> i am against discrimination. >> i think the french government is not totally wrong. >> it's pointed out here that other countries have removed thousands of romas without attracting such criticism. and the help hasn't been fully used. but today's comments are a huge embarrassment to an embattled president, sarkozy, now he stands as playing the tough cop. so far, he has not responded to today's attack. although the french foreign ministry s
distractions can one white house handle? including at the u.n. >> some sectors of the u.s. government orchestrated the attack to reversion the declining american -- reverse the declining american economy. gwen: on the senate floor. >> the appeal of don't ask-don't tell is an appeal to the gay and lesbian base. gwen: finger pointing on parade. covering the week, jackie calmes of "the new york times." naftali bendavid of "the wall street journal." tom gjelten of n.p.r. and nancy youssef of mcclatchy newspapers. >> award winning reporting and analysis covering history as it happens. live from our nation's capital, this is "washington week with gwen ifill." produced in association with national journal. funding for "washington week" is provided by -- >> we know why we're here. >> to connect our forces to what they need, when they need it. >> to help troops see danger. before it sees them. >> to answer the call of the brave and bring them safely home. >> around the globe, the people of boeing are working together to support and protect all who serve. >> that's why we're here. >> funding fo
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 53 (some duplicates have been removed)

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